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The Limits of Viewpoint Diversity

  There is a specter haunting viewpoint diversity: the question of its limits. Viewpoint diversity can feel like an unqualified good. Almost everyone understands, on at least some level, that we need multiple perspectives to solve difficult problems. If everyone thinks the same way, biases go unchallenged and creativity stalls. It’s easy to draw an..

Nick Phillips: Conservatives are passing laws requiring public universities to protect free speech. It’s probably a bad idea

So what do these bills do? They reinforce the message that when a community is having trouble navigating competing truth claims, you go outside the community and find an authority figure to put their foot down. The social justice set will get the message. They’ll make sure to have bills of their own at the ready for the next time they get control of a state legislature, and they’ll design administrative countermeasures to resist at the campus level. This is a recipe for polarized stalemate in our divided country.

Campus Conservatives Should Check Their Own Trolling

Nick Phillips, Research Associate at Heterodox Academy and President of the NYU School of Law Federalist Society, has a new piece in American Conservative on the need for Conservative campus groups to consider inviting more measured, academic speakers as opposed to provocateurs that inflame tensions and deepen tribalism.

Free Speech is the Most Effective Antidote to Hate Speech

On December 6th, Texas A&M University will play host to Richard Spencer, a leader of the “alt-right” movement, and an open white supremacist. Many will likely view Spencer’s presence at Texas A & M as confirmation that Donald Trump’s election to the presidency has allowed fringe political views to enter mainstream discussion. When Spencer, or someone like him, makes a statement like “America was, until this last generation, a white country, designed for ourselves and our posterity. It is our creation and our inheritance, and it belongs to us,” many people may question why we should remain committed to the First Amendment. This post argues why members of an academic community need to remain steadfast in that commitment, even when faced with a figure like Richard Spencer.