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THE BLOG

Three Strategies for Navigating Moral Disagreements

By: Musa Al-Gharbi, research associate at Heterodox Academy We in America and Western Europe, and by now many other places in the world, have this idea of people as fundamentally rational. On this account, our profound cognitive abilities are designed to help us discover objective truths about the world through logical argument and empirical observation...

On 1968: A Realigning Period

In his landmark 1955 article “A Theory of Critical Elections”, V.O. Key posited that certain U.S. elections result in dramatic reconfigurations of political parties, or realignments. During these elections – which are typically preceded by intense periods of political and societal discord – Republican and Democratic platforms shift dramatically and there is a realignment of voting blocs. Elections generally accepted as realignments are 1800, 1828, 1860, 1896, 1932 and 1968. Given that the 1968 realignment is commonly viewed as the last widely-accepted realignment and foundational to contemporary politics, understanding the events surrounding it is important if we are to gain a better sense of our current division.

George Yancey (North Texas) on Anti-Christian Bias & Race Relations: Half Hour of Heterodoxy #2

This week Chris Martin talks to sociologist George Yancey, another founding member of Heterodox Academy. George Yancey teaches sociology at the University of North Texas. He has published numerous books on anti-Christian bias within the academy and in the community at large. He has also written about multiracial churches and a "mutual responsibility model" for addressing structural racism.

Ideological Homophily in the 4th Estate

In a recent article for the Times Higher Education I pointed out how the lack of ideological diversity among social researchers not only undermines the extent to which research is trusted, funded or utilized, but also undermines researchers’ “capacity to understand phenomena, predict trends, or craft effective interventions.”

A recent study by Jack Shafer and Tucker Doherty, published by Politico, suggests that journalistic outlets face many of the same challenges as academic institutions: