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Video of the Heterodox Academy and FIRE Panel on Viewpoint Diversity

Heterodox Academy (HxA) and the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) livestreamed and hosted a panel discussion in front of a packed audience last night at New York University. The discussion focused on the decline in viewpoint diversity in higher education and its impact on the quality of research, scholarship, education, as well as its consequences for American democracy. The full video is now available.

Jonathan Haidt on Heterodox Academy’s 2nd Anniversary: Half Hour of Heterodoxy #12

Half Hour of Heterodoxy #12: Jonathan Haidt (@JonHaidt) is a co-founder and executive director of Heterodox Academy. He is a professor of business ethics at New York University’s Stern School of Business, and has written The Happiness Hypothesis: Finding Modern Truth in Ancient Wisdom (2006) and The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion (2012), which became a New York Times bestseller.

Scott Lilienfeld on Microaggressions, and The Goldwater Rule: Half Hour of Heterodoxy #10

  Scott Lilienfeld is professor of psychology at Emory University. Here, he talks about his 2016 article evaluating the psychological literature on microaggressions and his 2017 article about revoking the Goldwater rule. Scott is an Association for Psychological Science fellow, and he has published numerous studies in personality psychology, social psychology, political psychology, and clinical..

The Implications of Charlottesville

Like everyone else, I’ve been thinking a lot about the events in Charlottesville last week, and President Trump’s comments about those events. I taught at UVA for 16 years and I lived a few blocks East of Emancipation Park (back when it was called “Lee Park”). I share in the horror felt by my friends and former neighbors that neo-Nazis, the KKK, terrorism, and death came to our lovely town.... To explain why I thought “very fine people” could be a turning point, I wrote an essay for The Atlantic in which I analyzed the whole affair through the lens of my research on moral psychology—specifically the psychology of sacredness, taboo, and contamination. I showed how the psychology of sacredness could explain why the alt-right would march to defend a statue, why UVA students would risk their lives to defend another statue, and why the President’s delays and equivocations in condemning white supremacists are likely to have longer-lasting effects than his previous taboo violations. ... What are the implications of Charlottesville for universities, and for those of us who believe that viewpoint diversity is a good thing, and who believe that we need more of it on many campuses? There are many, and its going to take us a while to work them all out. I have no time to write this week, but I just wanted to raise a few points briefly, as markers for future posts.

Rick Shweder on Multiculturalism and Diversity | Half Hour of Heterodoxy #9

Apologies for the audio and video problems in this episode. In this episode, Chris Martin (@Chrismartin76) interviews Rick (Richard) Shweder, cultural anthropologist at University of Chicago’s Department of Comparative Human Development. He is author and editor of numerous books including Thinking Through Cultures: Expeditions in Cultural Psychology and Why Do Men Barbecue? Recipes for Cultural..