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THE BLOG

Announcing the Winners of the HxA Open Mind Awards

Heterodox Academy is delighted to announce the winners of the first-ever HxA Open Mind Awards. These awards honor the courageous individuals and innovative institutions that are making academic life better by helping others to reap the benefits of viewpoint diversity. The awards will be conferred and the honorees will be celebrated at a conference in New York City on June 14 and 15. Here are the awards and the winners:

The Greater Male Variability Hypothesis – An Addendum to our post on the Google Memo

In this addendum we focus on the Greater Male Variability Hypothesis – the idea that men are more variable than women on a variety of abilities, interests, and personality traits – and the possibility that males are overrepresented in the upper and lower tails of such distributions.  This hypothesis was first proposed by Ellis over 100 years ago, in 1894.  It is also the hypothesis that Lawrence Summers was referring to in 2005 when, at the National Bureau of Economic Research Conference, he weighed in on the gender gap in STEM professions.

The Google Memo: What Does the Research Say About Gender Differences?

The recent Google Memo on diversity, and the immediate firing of its author, James Damore, have raised a number of questions relevant to the mission of Heterodox Academy. Large corporations deal with many of the same issues that we wrestle with at universities, such as how to seek truth and achieve the kinds of diversity we want, being cognizant that we are tribal creatures often engaged in motivated reasoning, operating within organizations that are at risk of ideological polarization.

In this post, we address the central empirical claim of Damore’s memo, which is contained in its second sentence.

Research Summary: Langbert, Quain, & Klein: Faculty Voter Registration in Economics, History, Journalism, Law, and Psychology

Previous blog posts at Heterodox Academy have discussed the rising homogeneity of political identities among professors at universities within the United States. Sam Abrams explored how the left-to-right ratio has increased over the past 25 years, particularly at colleges and universities in New England.  I have also reviewed work by Honeycutt and Freberg (2016) which..

On the Role of the Public Intellectual in the United States

A guest post by Preston Stovall, member of the academic precariat, and currently an adjunct instructor at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, a researcher with Studium Consulting, and a Visiting Scholar at the University of Pittsburgh. I One doesn’t have to look long or hard to see contentious divisions in American society today.  From punditry..

Which Of These Academics Got Suspended?

  • Lee Jussim
  • November 1, 2016

[Note: This essay was posted on Nov. 1, 2016, based on information available at the time. Since then the story has gotten more complicated. Based on Rectenwald’s followup essay in the Washington Post, Nov. 3, it seems that he was not “suspended,” but that he is in trouble with his department and his dean for..

The Liberal and Conservative Experience Across Academic Disciplines: An Extension of Inbar and Lammers

Are progressive academics openly hostile and discriminatory towards their conservative colleagues?  Could such hostility help explain the well-known discrepancy between progressive* and conservative faculty members on college campuses? Initial research published by Yoel Inbar and Joris Lammers in 2012 suggested that the answer to these questions is yes – at least among social and personality psychologists. ..